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Today was a great day. We worshipped together in the oldest church building in the Diocese, ate lunch in the oldest Rectory and walked 13 kms to the only church in the Province with an old fashioned, triple decker pulpit. It was great to walk with about 15 people from Kingston to Long reach. Over 40 came to Evening Prayer and this was followed by a barbeque. In addition, Trevor and I were able to have hot showers at the Fire Hall. 

Another highlight was a visit to the local museum. It can be found in the basement of the school opposite Trinity Church. It is a little gem and clearly dearly loved. There is a great collection of artefacts, telling the story of peninsular life over the centuries. Connor, the young man who showed us around, is highly committed to its future. He says that it is open most days during the summer months. Well worth the trip. 

This morning’s podcast from Thy Kingdom Come once again featured Tom Wright. His main message was about thanksgiving and it set me thinking. How easily I, perhaps we, forget to be thankful. Not only to God, but also to family, friends and strangers. Taking people or things for granted often happens; it is only when they are not there that we notice and by then it may be too late. 

As many of you know my Mother is undergoing a period of ill health, from which she is unlikely to recover. In recent weeks her mind has become so confused that she is not really there anymore. I can hear her voice on the telephone when we speak, but in truth it is only a shadow of the person I have known all my life. In my family open shows of affection have never been part of life. My parents and I know that we love each other, but we do not say it. Recently, as in the last year, my Mother has begun to tell me she loves me at the end of every conversation and even in her confusion she still does and I respond in kind. In her current state it is the best I can do to express my thanks for my Mom, who she is and what she has done for me over these last 59 years. 

I know that I have missed many opportunities to do this sooner and it makes me sad to think of it. To thank someone recognizes their worth and affirms their place in our lives. Thanking God is an acknowledgement of his grace and pushes us beyond ourselves into understanding that we are not stand-alone, independent people, but part of a web of relationships, both natural and supernatural, upon which we rely for our existence and well-being. 

+David

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1 Comment


Lynn Melanson 5 months ago

As hard as it is to watch a parent slowly disappear into confusion and disability, perhaps the gift is in the lowering of barriers and inhibitions and so being able to finally say the things that have been felt, but unspoken for so long. While we may feel sad at not having been able to communicate these feelings earlier, we can at least be thankful that we can do so now and that our parent is still alert enough to express their and receive our love. No doubt, Bishop David, there are more than a few of us who are in the same situation as that in which you find yourself. We will all continue to pray for you and your parents. You are so right that it is important to thank people, to recognize their worth and their place in our lives. And yes, often we leave it until it is too late. You've been given a gift. Treasure each conversation with your Mother; don't regret the ones you never had.
Wishing you and Trevor and those walking with you continued fair weather and happy adventures on your journey.

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